Staff Picks

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

Ex Machina: The First Hundred Days follows New York City superhero Mitchell Hundred as he decides to retire when he realizes he can effect real change by becoming Mayor of his city.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

I have often enjoyed reading books in which the author uses letters or diary/journal entries to weave a story. These Is My Words by Nancy Turner, Letters From Yellowstone by Diane Smith, and Letters to Callie by Dawn Miller were good reads that used this type of plot development.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

Ever try to climb Mt. Everest when near the top you nearly die and then sense an uncanny invisible presence pushing to you survive the climb? No? Recent climbers have named the phenomenon the third man factor, but they’re not the only ones to describe it. During his famous South Pole expedition, Ernest Shackleton wrote of an experience that he initially kept secret, not wanting to appear unstable to his crew.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

In 1904, 25-year-old Carrine Gafkjen traveled to bleak, blustery North Dakota to stake out a 160-acre homestead. After living alone for 6 months, barring her door against coyotes and walking 10 miles weekly for drinking water, she meets the conditions of the Homestead Act, and the land is hers. This is just the beginning of a remarkable true story of pioneering courage.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

A new, highly desirable, carefully controlled commodity is about to be introduced to Europe’s markets. Miquel Lienzo is a trader down on his luck, who believes this new gold –“coffee”- could re-establish his credibility – if he can find the funds necessary to carry out an audacious plan.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

Always in search of a new great mystery/thriller that will keep me reading through the late night hours, I discovered The Last Child by John Hart on the Edgar Awards website.  John Hart's first novel was nominated for Best First Novel, his second won the Edgar for Best Novel, and his third one, The Last Child, is a 2010 nominee for Best Novel.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

This offbeat love story will be a delight for readers who enjoy quirky characters in unusual situations. Set in Sweden, this novel is about broken hearts and fumbling relationships. It is charming and funny and begins in a graveyard where a smile brought together two lonely people who couldn’t possibly be more different from one another. There is nothing traditional or predictable about their down-to-earth story, told by each lover in alternating chapters.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

A serial killer is murdering young women across the country. He has been dubbed the "Christopher Killer" because he leaves a St. Christopher medal with each of his victims. Dr. Jewel, a famous psychic, predicted that the next "Christopher Killer" victim would be found "on a dirt road somewhere in the mountain where the road leads to water".

Staff Review

Dating Dead Men by Harley Jane Kozak

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Mar 5, 2010

I was looking for a funny fast paced read-alike to Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum series so I picked up Dating Dead Men by Harley Jane Kozak. Wollie Shelley is a lovable heroine with a sassy sidekick. She juggles her greeting card store which is undergoing inspections for a franchise opportunity and a dating project for a local radio talkshow.

Staff Review Mar 5, 2010

Rhoda Janzen has it all. She has her Ph.D, her Prada and her lake house. She also has a very handsome husband, Nick, who has just left her for a man named Bob that he met on gay.com. If that isn't enough, Rhoda is involved in a serious car accident one short week after learning about Bob. How can this possibly be one of the funniest memoirs I've read to date?

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