Science Fiction

Wednesday, Jun 3, 2020

I watched the first episode of Star Trek: Discovery when it premiered and...it just didn't feel like Star Trek to me. The Klingons looked like orcs from Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movies. The overall feel was too flashy while also being too cynical--and my favorite Star Trek series is Deep Space Nine, which is overall the darkest series in the franchise. Then the rest of the series was locked behind the paywall of the CBS All Access channel and I didn't want to pay to watch a series that turned me off with its first episode, so I gave up on it.

Cover art for Mary Robinette Kowal's The Calculating Stars, featuring a group of women silhouetted against the sky

The Calculating Stars

Mary Robinette Kowal
4
Rated by
Hebah A.H.
Tuesday, May 19, 2020

One of my personal reading goals I set when Covid-19 first started turning things upside down was to read more of the books on my own personal shelves, things I'd bought but not read yet. I wasn't counting on my reading mojo plummeting, and truthfully, as far as timing went, I might have chosen a bit more wisely than to read a book that begins with a cataclysmic event that will likely be a human extinction event in time.

Book Cover

Maximillian Fly

Angie Sage
4
Rated by
Chris K.
Tuesday, Apr 28, 2020

Odd in a wonderful way, dark, and unique.

I am Fly. Maximillian Fly. I am a good creature. I am not bad, as some will tell you.

But I see you do not believe me. . . .

Planet of the Apes 1968 Poster

Staying-At-Home... on the Planet of the Apes!

Arthur P. Jacobs
4
Rated by
Michael K
Friday, Apr 17, 2020

Shortly before the library closed due to the novel coronavirus, my co-worker, Adam, loaned me a set with all five of the original Planet of the Apes films - three of which are currently in the Johnson County Library collection, and two of which are available to stream from home on IndieFlix.

cover of Way of Kings, man with sword standing on canyon plateau

The Way of Kings

Brandon Sanderson
5
Rated by
Megan K.
Wednesday, Mar 4, 2020

Monday, Dec 16, 2019

You’ve heard of Dungeons and Dragons. Right?

It’s been around for 45 year and been in everything from Simpsons to Stranger things.

What is it?

It’s a pen and paper Roleplaying game. A set of rules to tell a shared story with friends and family with a backdrop of classic sword and sorcery in the vein of The Lord of the Rings.

Thursday, Dec 5, 2019

The term "bottle movie" is borrowed from the "ship in a bottle" metaphor. Much like a ship caught in a bottle, the characters in these films are seemingly locked in one place. And it's no secret that many of these films are based upon hit stage plays where changing settings even once is a difficult task to achieve.

Book Cover

Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful

Arwen Elys Dayton
4
Monday, Nov 18, 2019

This is top-notch science fiction--it takes today's scientific advancements and speculates how they might play out in the future, considering legal, ethical, and practical ramifications along the way. The book does this over the course of six lightly connected stories, each progressively further in the future. The topic is gene editing and body modification.

Yellow background with title and author along with a large infinity symbol

Recursion

Blake Crouch
4
Rated by
Heather C
Monday, Sep 30, 2019

Recursion occurs when a thing is defined in terms of itself or of its type. --Wikipedia

I first heard about this book on NPR and was intrigued enough to immediately put it on my holds list. You can find out more about how to make your own holds list here. Let me just say that this book did not disappoint!

Tell the Machine Goodnight cover

Tell The Machine Goodnight

Katie Williams
4
Rated by
Jed D.
Monday, Sep 16, 2019

What if a machine could tell you how to be happy? What if your results could be manipulated? What if you had to do something illegal, immoral, or unethical to achieve happiness? These are a few of the questions posed in the speculative fiction novel Tell the Machine Goodnight, by Katie Williams. Set in 2035, our protagonist Pearl works for a Facebook or Google-like tech organization, Apricity, whose name means "the warmth of the sun during winter". Businesses include Apricty readings as a benefit.

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