dysfunctional families

Book Cover

One of the Boys

Daniel Magariel
5
Rated by
Chris K.
Tuesday, Jul 3, 2018

Wow. This little book packs a punch. One of the Boys is short, quick reading, deceptively simple, and deeply affecting.

The twelve-year-old narrator has always revered his affable, charismatic father. After witnessing a "war" of separation and divorce, he desperately wants to be "one of the boys" with his dad and older brother when they decide to leave Kansas for New Mexico. He wants to be there to experience his dad's promised freedom to be like a kid again. So he does what it takes to make it happen.

https://jocolibrary.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1499678036_aftermath

Aftermath

Clara Kensie
5
Friday, Jun 29, 2018

When Charlotte was eleven, she was kidnapped from a football game. For the past four years, she has been held in her kidnapper’s attic, and raped every night (just warning you, this book is hard core, don’t let that beautiful fantasy cover fool you), sustained only by dreams of her loving family. But now, she has finally escaped. But losing her has torn her family apart. Her parents are divorced, her dad is obsessed with fame, her mother drinks too much, and her sister is a druggie. Her father wants her to write a book and be the figurehead of a new charity and her mother wants her to...

Sunday, Jun 24, 2018

In her immigrant's memoir told in graphic novel form, Thi Bui explores the saga of her family's escape from Vietnam in the 1970's to the United States.

This is a picture of the cover of the book, The Book of Polly.

The Book of Polly

Kathy Hepinstall
4
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Thursday, Feb 15, 2018

The Book of Polly is the hilarious and bittersweet story of Willow and her larger-than-life mom, Polly. Polly becomes pregnant with Willow in her late fifties, and Willow’s father dies during the pregnancy. Because her father dies before she is born and Polly has Willow so late in life, Willow only has Polly. Her siblings are long gone, and the bustling life that comes with having a full family is absent, so Willow clings to Polly with heartbreaking tenacity. Willow has always been consumed by the fear that Polly is go

Bastards

Bastards

Mary Anna King
4
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Tuesday, Feb 28, 2017

Mary Anna King’s first six years of life are anything but stable.

Cover

The Boston Girl

Anita Diamant
4
Rated by
Hannah Jane C.
Friday, Feb 3, 2017

The Boston Girl is told by 85-year-old Addie, who revisits her long life of memories during an interview given by one of her grandchildren. It’s an incredibly intimate one-sided conversation that completely ensnares the reader. This storytelling style made me feel as if Addie was my grandmother. Like other special books with superb storytelling, The Boston Girl envelopes the reader inside a bubble. While reading it, you feel like you are living the story and your real life is just an inconv

Devoted

Jennifer Mathieu
5
Rated by
Becky C.
Friday, Sep 2, 2016

As a children’s librarian, it’s uncommon that I recommend a book about a teenage runaway to parents looking for a book about relationship-building. But author Jennifer Mathieu has written an uncommon book. I just can’t recommend it highly enough.

Eleanor & Park

Rainbow Rowell
5
Monday, Apr 4, 2016

I typically roll my eyes at romance novels--they are so fake! But Eleanor & Park is different. Perhaps because Eleanor and Park are different. Eleanor Douglas and Park Sheridan--the lead characters in this romance--are different from most romance novel characters, but also just different. Different from their boorish peers. Different from their lame teachers.

Wednesday, Mar 9, 2016

Good, but not great. Published thirteen years ago, it doesn't quite hold up today. Ginny is unbelievably pathetic throughout most of the story, and only toward the Hollywood-like ending does she-surprise-develop some confidence. Normally I love pathetic people because I can relate to their insecurity, but Ginny's character is a tad too two-dimensional, not a fully fleshed out character worthy of my concern.

We Were Liars

E. Lockhart
4
Wednesday, Dec 23, 2015

Let me share a secret with you. I'm ashamed to admit, but I'm a total snob when it comes to wealthy characters. I generally find them unlikable, which I know is awful judgy of me. No matter how great John Green says it is, I wanted to barf all the way through The Great Gatsby.

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