Staff Picks

Staff Review Feb 17, 2010

“Since John Logie Baird invented the color television in 1944, I refuse to watch anything on TV in black and white.” Does this sound like something you would say? Please make an exception and watch this classic film starring Ronald Coleman and Jane Wyatt. A recent conversation with colleagues brought up the subject of Lost Horizon and Shangri-la and I remembered how much I had enjoyed re-runs of this movie on late night TV over 40 years ago. I don’t know how many times I watched it but I absolutely loved it.

Staff Review Feb 12, 2010

Anne Tyler considers Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant her best novel, and I can see why. Channeling his protagonist Holden Caulfield, J.D.

Staff Review Feb 12, 2010

I really enjoy reading books found in the cookbook section of the library's collection. The author Sandra Lee says, "Real meals for real life".  She offers organizing tips in the beginning of her book and colorful pictures throughout her book of each delicious dish! This month has been chilly and I am looking forward to trying the Roasted Tomato-Basil Soup on page 150! Also the Tropical Fruit Salad with Key Lime Yogut sounds good too on page 173.

Staff Review Feb 11, 2010

I was leery of this science fiction film; I didn’t like the sound of the plot. The year is 2057, and the sun is dying. Well, first of all, according to all the science I’ve read, Earth’s sun isn’t in danger of dying, going supernova or expanding into a red giant and engulfing the planet anytime soon (put the latter on your calendar for, oh, about five billion years from now).

Staff Review Feb 11, 2010

Canadian singer/guitarist Bruce Cockburn (pronounced CO-burn) has had the kind of career that is enviable from a critical standpoint and somewhat regrettable from a popular one. That is, Cockburn’s memorable, intelligent songs have been praised over and over in the music magazines, but after decades of doing this, he’s still not that well-known to the public.

Staff Review Feb 10, 2010

World War II is beginning and young Davy and his best friend Scooter are busy doing their part by collecting the junk de jour. One day they're searching for scrap metal in creepy old Mr. Stonecypher's attic the next they're scavenging for milkweed near an old barn. While they're searching around the barn they spy a vintage car and try out the seats. They're scared to death when a woman shoots her shotgun and announces that they're on her property. I loved this book.

Staff Review Feb 10, 2010

I had not experienced The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald before I read it this month for my book club. I didn't know what I was missing! A great story about class and status, relationships, wealth, power, lost love, and loyalty. I listened to this rather than read it.

Staff Review Feb 10, 2010

edited by Barbara Graham. This collections of essays by well-known writers/grandmothers is not the sweet book about being a nana that I was looking for. It's like a punch in the gut, actually. It's an honest look at what being a grandmother is really like for these women. There's no sugar coating here.

Staff Review Feb 9, 2010

In letters to each other written for a school assignment Christina and Elizabeth share their lives; the happy, the sad, the confusing and the hurtful. My initial reaction was that the letter-writing device was a bit over-used, but soon became absorbed in the story.

Staff Review Feb 9, 2010

This a wonderful book that celebrates a woman who has broken into male dominated sports. This is a story about Jackie Mitchell who achieved some element of success in the early stages of major league baseball. It celebrates her story and her life and direction. She was a pitcher who developed a very debilitating curve ball. The pitch was effective enough to strike out some of the best major league hitting stars, including Babe Ruth.

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