kids

May 11, 2020

All good children's stories are the same: young creature breaks rules, has incredible adventure, then returns home with the knowledge that aforementioned rules are there for a reason.


Of course, the actual message to the careful reader is: break rules as often as you can, because who the hell doesn't want to have an adventure?


― Brian K. Vaughan, Saga, Vol. 3


The largest population of orphans anywhere in the world is within the pages of children's books. This Barnes & Noble article gives a nice list of some of the most familiar: Little Orphan Annie, Anne (of Green Gables)

Coraline

By Neil Gaiman
5
Rated by Sam S.
Oct 26, 2016

While exploring the new home Coraline and her family have just moved in to, she stumbles upon a small, mysterious door hidden behind wallpaper in one of the rooms. Through it, she discovers a world very much like her own, and yet very different, including alternate versions of her parents and neighbors. This alluring world turns dark when she finds that her parents have been kidnapped and she is slowly becoming trapped in a web of her Other Mother's making.

Endgame

By DVD
3
Rated by Terri B.
Aug 27, 2016

Endgame, with Rico Rodriquez from Modern Family, is a make-you-feel-good movie inspired by true events. This independent film was shot in only nineteen days, and the children could work, at most, six hours per day. Other actors include Efron Ramiez, who played Pedro in Napoleon Dynamite, and Jon Greis, also from Napoleon Dynamite.


Jose, played by Rico Rodriquez, has a knack for chess, having played with his grandmother since he was five years old. Jose’s older brother, Miguel, is just as good at soccer as Jose is at chess, but their mother, Karla, only acknowledges Miguel’s abilities

Explore Egypt with Youth!

0
Rated by Erin H.
Feb 18, 2010

Next month, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is featuring 19th century photography of Egypt. If you're planning to take young friends along, consider supplying them with some books that will pique their interest and prepare them for the experience.

tut.gifTutankhamun: the mystery of the boy king by Zahi Hawass
You've likely seen the author of this book on television, explaining the mysteries of Egyptian archeology. He's the head of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities, and in this book he explains the life (and death) of one of Egypt's most famous kings. The photographs help Tut's story come