Explore Egypt with Youth!

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Feb 18, 2010

Next month, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is featuring 19th century photography of Egypt. If you're planning to take young friends along, consider supplying them with some books that will pique their interest and prepare them for the experience.

tut.gifTutankhamun: the mystery of the boy king by Zahi Hawass
You've likely seen the author of this book on television, explaining the mysteries of Egyptian archeology. He's the head of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities, and in this book he explains the life (and death) of one of Egypt's most famous kings. The photographs help Tut's story come to life as the boy king who never made it out of his teens. Mystery lovers will like debating the evidence for and against a possible murder.

egypt.gifEyewitness Ancient Egypt by George Hart
This is a strong entry in the Eyewitness series from DK, which is popular with young people due to their skillful use of pictures supporting the text. Get a total overview of everything Egypt: pyramid building, workers in the fields, children's lives, emblems and symbols, and even ancient medicine!


cleo.gifYou wouldn't want to be Cleopatra! by Jim Pipe and David Antram
This fun, quick read is a breezy fictionalized account of Cleopatra's times. As with all of the "You wouldn't want to be" series, the emphasis is on the huge contrast between modern and ancient life. Quirky cartoon-style illustrations drive home the point that being queen isn't all it's cracked up to be!

hat.gifHatshepsut: the princess who became king by Ellen Galford.
Women rulers of Egypt each had their own approach and made the throne their own. If you were a girl about to become pharaoh in ancient Egypt, how would you reign supreme? Hatshepsut's answer was to wear guys' clothes, paste on a fake beard, and she had artwork that portrayed her as male! Learn all about her unique reign.

Written by Erin H.

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