cooking

May 26, 2012

The Kitchen Counter Cooking School chronicles a project inspired by a supermarket encounter, which turned into an epiphany: Cooking has become a spectator sport of Cooking Channel watching.

At the grocery store Flinn struck up a conversation with a woman loading up a basket full of processed food.  Flinn spent time cruising the aisles of the store with the woman and convinced her to put the packaged food back on the shelf and to try cooking with real food. The shopper later became a part of a group of nine women and a year-long project; teaching them cooking skills and how to make informed

The Love and Lemons Cookbook

By Jeanine Donofrio
5
Rated by Sarah A.
Apr 28, 2016

Just in time for farmers market season Jeanine Donofrio has launched the new cookbook The Love and Lemons Cookbook: an Apple to Zucchini Celebration of Impromptu Cooking, which includes beautiful photography by her husband Jack Mathews. Rather than being divided into category chapters, such as Appetizers, Salads, or Desserts, the book is arranged by fresh ingredients, such as Asparagus or Mushrooms, encouraging readers to use what they have in their fridge or pantry at the time. The recipes are all vegetarian, with many being vegan or gluten free. The pair hails from Austin, TX and it seems

Jun 26, 2012

This memoir provides a window into the most prestigious culinary institute in the world, the Paris Cordon Bleu.  It was written while the author herself was one of the students there. The book contains witty observations from the world of haute cuisine and covers basic recipes and cooking instruction, together with a few tricks and shortcuts she learned there. 

Faced with a crossroad in her life, the author impulsively decided to move to Paris and pursue the dream she once confided to Julia Child: to study at the Cordon Bleu. Kathleen describes in detail her new friends and competitive

Jan 22, 2013

As the title suggests, this book is about food, cooking and restaurants. Gopnik, an investigative journalist by trade, tells us everything one wants to know about the history of cooking and restaurants, including the new eating trends such as the molecular cuisine of Barcelona. Gopnik examines our choices of food.  In an apolitical way he gives an inside view into the meat vs. vegetarian debate.   My favorite quotation: “Cooking is the faith that raw ingredients can be conjured into a nightly miracle”.  The Table Comes First is a great book for all practitioners or theorists of the art of

Aug 25, 2010

Vegan BrunchDespite what my other reviews have covered, I do have friends or occasions where special diets are needed.  Vegan Brunch was just what I needed when vegan & vegetarian friends stopped over for a weekend.  It’s arranged by type of food, divided up in chapters such as The Savory, The Sweet, and The Toppings.  There are many tips on buying and preparing vegan ingredients, setting a table for brunch, and tips for certain recipes.  The recipes are not overly complicated nor are they extraordinarily time consuming.

The first meal we had was a Caramelized Vidalia Onion Quiche, Red Flannel Hash, and

Jan 20, 2016

A veggie-lover’s dream! This cookbook takes us through the alphabet one vegetable at a time, with classics like potatoes to more unusual veggies like daikon. He even sneaks in a few fruits, like the tomato. V is for Vegetables is not expressly vegetarian, although some of the recipes certainly are.


Chef Michael Anthony brings his experiences abroad into many of his recipes, resulting in a rich blend of classic American dishes with more exotic fusions. He provides pleasant introductions to each vegetable, with entertaining narration, clear cooking explanations, and helpful tips and

Apr 11, 2013

Did you ever wonder what the difference is between baking soda and baking powder, why there are so many different kinds of flour, and what is Dutch cocoa?  If so, you are just the type of advanced cook for whom this book is intended.  It is full of the culinary science involved in various cooking methods and ingredients, which the author explains plainly and understandably to anyone without any heavy science background.  What Einstein Told His Cook debunks the mysteries of water filters, the process of coffee decaffeination, and BTUs as the measurement of stove energy output, as well as