Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan; narrated by MacLeod Andrews and Nick Podehl (Audio CD)

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Sep 18, 2012

Will Grayson is your average high school student—just trying to get through school while not attracting too much attention. This plan doesn’t always work very well because his best friend, Tiny Cooper (who is not tiny, by the way), is loud. And Tiny is about to attract way more attention because he wants to put on a musical about his life . . . for the entire school.

On the other side of Chicago lives another Will Grayson, also in high school. His plan is a little more complicated. This Will Grayson wants to get through high school without anyone finding out he is gay. Will Grayson hates school and counts down the seconds until he can be at home chatting online with his friend Isaac.

These two very different Will Graysons of Chicago are about to meet and their lives will never be the same.

I loved this story, with one Will Grayson being written by John Green and one by David Levithan. The chapters alternate between the two main characters’ points of view, letting you get to know each Will Grayson on his own and then their differing perspectives in the same situation.

I listened to the audiobook and it was phenomenal! Narrators MacLeod Andrews and Nick Podehl really brought the characters to life. I felt like I was sitting at a high school cafeteria table or in the audience at Tiny Cooper’s musical (the narrators sing!). I found myself laughing and, I’ll admit, tearing up while listening. I listen to a lot of audiobooks, and so far this year Will Grayson, Will Grayson is my favorite. I was sad when the story came to an end and plan on listening again soon.

This is a great listen/read for any young adult or adult. I would really suggest picking up the audiobook if you get a chance. If you’re not an audiobook person, give it a try. If you’re still not enjoying the audiobook, please pick up the book.

Written by Rachel N.

I love nachos.

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