trauma

Apr 7, 2021

“Poetry is a matter of life, not just of language.” Lucille Clifton 


This quote—a favorite, I freely admit—echoed in my mind as I read and re-read Bridget Lowe’s second collection, My Second Work. I understand Clifton’s quote to mean that poetry can be esoteric—a symphony of sounds that lull us into a state in which we choose to not question the meaning of it all simply because it sounds so good in the air. Let’s be clear: I love poetry that sings to me and, sometimes, I do not care “what it means” or if it means anything to me, personally, because the language of it lets me imagine/lets me

I Crawl Through It

By A. S. King
5
Rated by Amy F.
Aug 24, 2015

I was lucky enough to hear AS King speak when she visited our Library in August 2015. Eventually, after much fascinating talk, one of the moderators got around to asking her about her newest book, I Crawl Through It. "What's it about?" We all laughed, as we had earlier established how difficult it can be to neatly summarize a King novel. But then King's expression turned serious and she said, "It's about the way teens have to deal, daily, with both intruder drills and standardized tests - and how messed up that is." I had already been planning on reading King's new book, but now I knew, I had to read it now.

The Marbury Lens

By Andrew Smith
5
Rated by Rachel C.
Jan 30, 2014

In the very first bit of this book, you learn that Jack lives with his grandparents, is best friends with Connor, and that he is kidnapped while drunk, nearly raped, and escapes through sheer luck.


It's all downhill from there.


I mean, sure, he's given a pair of magical glasses that transport him to another world, but given the choice between a world where friendly-seeming strangers can be hidden monsters, and a world where monsters are everywhere and clearly visible, which would you choose?  Do you stay with the friend you've known and loved your entire life, or do you protect a couple