conspiracies

Welcome to Night Vale

By Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor
4
Rated by Rachel C.
Sep 26, 2015

A friendly desert community where the sun is hot, the moon is beautiful, and mysterious lights pass overhead while we all pretend to sleep.


Welcome to Night Vale.


This book features side characters from the popular podcast Welcome to Night Vale. Fans of the show will be delighted with the trademark weirdness of the little town, and overjoyed to see referenced characters as protagonists and the origins of the Man in the Tan Jacket (I don't think a single fan has yet stumbled over the truth). If you've never heard of the show, I suspect you might be a bit lost in the meandering prose

Jul 10, 2013

When slacker web designer Clay Jannon finds himself downsized into unemployment, he takes a job working the overnight shift in a small, quirky bookstore, run by the eccentric Mr. Penumbra. Restlessness and curiosity drive Clay to stumble onto a vast, old conspiracy. Suddenly, his world is a collision of old and new, ancient bound books and pirated ebooks, hipster New York bars and Google headquarters in California. Such is the fun, fast-paced, geeky adventure of Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore.

I adore this book! I'm not usually a fast reader, but I tore through Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour

Jul 16, 2012

Surprisingly, this book is not about Prague, or its famous cemetery; in fact only about 100 out of 460 pages cover anything remotely relating to Prague.  The Prague Cemetery describes infamous hoaxes, forgeries and plagiarisms of the 19th century and how they fueled some of the most notable historical events that humanity would rather forget.   

Eco’s novel revolves mostly around the infamous, fictitious document, the Protocol of the Elders of Zion, a text first published in Russia in 1903, and which spread quickly around the world in the early 20th century and is still being published to

Jan 8, 2011

The Book of Love is the second in the series: The Magdalene line.
Journalist, Maureen Paschal’s research uncovers a diary written by Matilda of Canossa (also referred to as Matilda of Tuscany), an eleventh century warrior countess. In her story, Matilda was a member of the Cathar society, protector of a book written in Jesus own hand, and secretly married to a pope.

I think this book is just as intriguing as The Expected One. There are portions which discuss lengthy historical details, which some have felt were tedious. I found the connections McGowan makes regarding historical events and