Reviews by Category: Non-fiction

Teen Review Aug 9, 2021

One of the greatest scientific discoveries has been made - on the brink of a war. It’s 1938, and chemist Otto Hahn has discovered that neutrons, at a high enough speed, can cause uranium atoms to split apart, releasing a huge amount of energy. The idea of an atomic bomb slowly falls into place and spreads like lightning, as Germany begins its campaign across Europe. As Germany begins collecting uranium, the rest of the world needs to catch up and create their own atomic bombs. Renowned scientists coalesce in Los Alamos, researching the atomic bomb, even with spies in their midst.

Teen Review
Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin

Black Like Me

By John Howard Griffin
3
Rated by
Saathwika A.
Jun 18, 2021

In this true story, a white man, journalist John Howard Griffin, decides to become a Negro to see how it feels like. At the beginning of the book, he meets with his friend and tells him his idea. Regardless of what others thought, John goes to New Orleans and consults with doctors. He changes his skin color to see how one would treat a negro. However, he learns that some still treat black men without equality. John decides to change that.

Teen Review
How to Avoid a Climate Disaster by Bill Gates

How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

By Bill Gates
5
Rated by
Zoe D.
Jun 7, 2021

In How to Avoid a Climate Disaster, Bill Gates discusses how at this point, climate change is unavoidable; too much time was not used to solve the climate change crisis, so wildfires, rising sea levels, increased storms for some and droughts for others are inevitable now and in the future.  However, the worst consequences of climate change are avoidable, just so long as every country can achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions.  Although the world is far from net-zero emissions, Gates mentions the current technologie

Teen Review
Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

Just Mercy

By Bryan Stevenson
5
Rated by
Brooke G.
Feb 24, 2021

Just Mercy is a first-person account of Bryan Stevenson, a black lawyer, who helps prisoners that did not receive fair trials as part of a non-profit organization. Stevenson writes about various clients that he has worked for over the years and how the justice system has failed them.

Teen Review
The Republican War on Science by Chris Mooney

The Republican War on Science

By Chris Mooney
3
Rated by
Taylor E.
Feb 10, 2021

The Republican War on Science​ is a nonfiction novel detailing the falsification of scientific evidence by the Republican Party written by Washington Post reporter Chris Mooney. This book relays several examples of Republicans falsifying, hiding, or cherry-picking scientific information to promote their own purposes, most of which come from the Bush administration. As expected, this book is clearly biased, but that didn’t make the information any less intriguing.

Teen Review
Cover photo of the book The Battle for Room 314

The Battle for Room 314

By Ed Boland
5
Rated by
Miranda H.
Jan 14, 2021

The Battle for Room 314 by Ed Boland, published in 2016, tells the compelling story of his year teaching in an inner-city high school in New York City. As a young man, Boland worked for Project Advance, a non-profit working to place low-income, inner-city students in elite boarding schools and eventually Ivy League universities; however, he begins to feel unfulfilled and wants to widen his impact to help more deserving students.

Teen Review
Cover photo of the book Killing the SS

Killing the SS

By Bill O'Reilly
4
Rated by
Eric S.
Jan 5, 2021

A must-read for any history fans, Killing the SS by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard shows the hunt to find the worst war criminals in the world and the race against time to bring them to justice. Dugard and O’Reilly bring you back to the end of WWII, following the stories of multiple “Nazi Hunters” who devoted their lives to catching these immoral individuals.

Teen Review
Cover photo of the book Mind and Matter

Mind and Matter: A Life in Math and Football

By John Urschel
4
Rated by
Raghu P.
Nov 5, 2020

John Urschel played professional football and is completing his Ph.D. at Harvard University in Mathematics. This memoir reveals John’s challenges of living with divorced parents, trying to become a math major and earning a Ph.D., and making it to the National Football League. Mr. Urschel’s biography is heart-warming and shows the ups and downs of his journey of making it to the NFL and earning a Ph.D. Urschel was interested in math at a very young age and loved solving math problems. It wasn’t until later in middle school that Urschel became interested in football.

Teen Review
Free Lunch by Rex Ogle

Free Lunch

By Rex Ogle
5
Rated by
Brooke Bazzel
Oct 26, 2020

Free Lunch is an autobiography by Rex Ogle, following him through the 6th grade being a kid from an under-privileged, abuse home in a wealthy school district. He's living with his half baby brother, his stepdad, and his mother. His mom puts him on the free lunch program at school and he's confused, but above all, embarrassed.

Teen Review Jun 20, 2019

Dreamland tells the tale of America's opiate epidemic in a way that feels as though you are hearing it firsthand; it weaves the stories of addicts and activists alike into a novel that is enticing and shocking. Quinones writes a novel that shows the behind the scenes of an epidemic that hits close to the heart of many Americans, yet he tells it in a way that takes you on an adventure rather than a report.

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