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What the Tech!?

There is a lot of technology in our daily lives. Our librarians can help with your internet, email, eBook, smartphone and tablet questions. Book a 30 minute, one-on-one help session with a techie librarian to find answers to your tech issues. Right now, we have appointments available at Antioch Library on Monday evenings, Tuesday mornings, and Tuesday evenings. Give us a call to schedule your appointment at (913) 826-4600.

There is a lot of technology in our daily lives. Our librarians can help with your internet, email, eBook, smartphone and tablet questions. Book a 30 minute, one-on-one help session with a techie librarian to find answers to your tech issues. Right now, we have appointments available at Antioch Library on Monday evenings, Tuesday mornings, and Tuesday evenings. Give us a call to schedule your appointment at (913) 826-4600.

Subscribe to the Did you hear? podcast to keep up on what our Librarians recommend and what’s happening at Johnson County Library! Subscribing is free and ensures the newest episode will be delivered to you the way you want:

Or search for “Did you hear?” on Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts!

Elementia, Book Burnout, Table Top Games, and Award Winners

We dedicated this episode of Did you hear? to Award Winners (12:36). From Bram Stoker to William Allen White award winners, you’ll find it all at jocolibrary.org/explore

Today we recommend cures to book burnout (13:04), discuss table top game nights (24:23) and offer board game suggestions as well. 

But first, Kate McNair brings teen writers and artists to talk with Dave Carson about elementia! (:28)

We dedicated this episode of Did you hear? to Award Winners (12:36). From Bram Stoker to William Allen White award winners, you’ll find it all at jocolibrary.org/explore

Today we recommend cures to book burnout (13:04), discuss table top game nights (24:23) and offer board game suggestions as well. 

But first, Kate McNair brings teen writers and artists to talk with Dave Carson about elementia! (:28)

Ta-Nehisi Coates

This Friday: Meet the Author: Ta-Nehisi CoatesTicket Giveaway! Meet the Author: A Conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coates

Ticket Giveaway: If you act fast, there are a limited number of free tickets to this event. Register online or call 913.826.4600 to request yours from the Johnson County Library. 

Meet the Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates

Pre-order admission packages are available on Rainy Day Books

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a journalist, blogger, and memoirist who brings personal reflection and historical scholarship to bear on America's most contested issues. He is a distin­guished writer in residence at NYU's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. He is the author of the bestselling books The Beautiful Struggle, We Were Eight Years in Power, and Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award in 2015. He is also the current author of the Marvel comics The Black Panther and Captain America. Coates was a 2015 MacArthur Fellow.

Coates writes about cultural, social and political issues, particularly regarding the African American experience. His visit coincides with the student/educator symposium of Race Project KC, organized by Johnson County Library. The symposium is an annual immersive social justice initiative focused on the role of racism in the history of the United States and more specifically the Kansas City area.

Presented in partnership with Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area, Metropolitan Community College - Penn Valley, the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art and the Office of the Mayor, Kansas City, MO. This event is presented with Rainy Day Books. 

NEW DATE: Per Ta-Nehisi Coates' request, this event is rescheduled for Friday, April 26, 2019, at 7:00 PM, at Unity Temple on The Plaza, Sanctuary. Original previously dated Admission Tickets will be accepted and honored at this author event.

 

Ticket Giveaway: If you act fast, there are a limited number of free tickets to this event. Register online or call 913.826.4600 to request yours from the Johnson County Library. 

Meet the Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates

Pre-order admission packages are available on Rainy Day Books

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a journalist, blogger, and memoirist who brings personal reflection and historical scholarship... Continue »

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Central Resource Library , Off-site
Hadiza

Hadiza

Hadiza is a talented songwriter, keyboardist and performer who describes her music as "not quite soul, blues, folk, jazz, rock or classical but it sort of is?" One listen to her debut EP, Gone, shows how much Hadiza's songs sit at the crossroads of all these styles while revealing a young songwriter finding her voice. Originally from Iowa City, Hadiza wrote most of the EP's songs over a two year period and is currently at work on a full album. We're fortunate to share an interview with this emerging artist. Enjoy.

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Please introduce yourself. Describe your music for new listeners.

My name is Hadiza [Kubura] Sa-Aadu but I release music and perform solo as Hadiza. It's hard for me to actually describe my sound but I suppose there are elements of jazz, soul, classical, blues, folk, and rock that all kind of show themselves here and there. I usually try to avoid describing my music with any specificity, but for those of who must have something I guess I would say my music is melodically and lyrically driven and usually starts with some riff or chords on the keys, then a vocal melody, then lyrics and then I get together with the band. It's not quite soul, blues, folk, jazz, rock or classical but it sort of is? Maybe this is just a ploy for new listeners to take a listen ;) 

Continue »

Throwback Thursday: Lackman Library

To begin the history of the Lackman Library, one must delve back into the very early history of the Johnson County Library. Shortly after its 1953 founding, the Library opened the Lenexa Branch on November 2, 1954 in the Lenexa Grade School at 13400 W. 94th Street. It offered about 3,000 books for checkout and was open for only two hours a week--2:00 to 4:00 on Saturdays. Like all the others it was staffed by volunteers and offered donated materials. The most recent US Census in 1950 had indicated a Lenexa population of 803. That population soon began to burgeon. When the Library’s budget allowed, the branch’s hours were increased and it was moved into a rented storefront in downtown Lenexa.

In 1967, a bond issue was approved by voters to build the Oak Park Library, among other improvements. This branch at 9500 Bluejacket was intended to serve the library needs of the “southwest” portion Johnson County’s developing suburban region, including Lenexa. In preparation for the new branch, the Lenexa Library was closed in 1967. The city of Lenexa was promised that someday there would again be a library within its city limits. The Oak Park Library opened in 1970, after being housed in temporary space near 95th and Antioch. The population continued to grow and soon the need for a new library west of I-35 was apparent and was included in the 1979 facilities plan.

Ground was broken for the Lackman Library on March 5, 1986. The building was dedicated on November 14, 1986 and opened to the public on November 17. It opened with a collection of 22,000 items and was the first Johnson County Library location without a card catalog, as the Library made a leap into the computer age. During its first full year open—1987—the Lackman Library circulated 99,220 items.

An expansion of Lackman was never far from the minds of staff during the planning and opening of the Shawnee Library in 1992, the Leawood Pioneer Library in 1994, the Central Resource Library in 1995, and the renovated Antioch Library in 1996. By August 10, 1996 when the Lackman Library closed for expansion, it barely fit its building. The new facility, three times as large as its previous incarnation with almost 18,000 square feet, re-opened on August 12, 1997. 

To begin the history of the Lackman Library, one must delve back into the very early history of the Johnson County Library. Shortly after its 1953 founding, the Library opened the Lenexa Branch on November 2, 1954 in the Lenexa Grade School at 13400 W. 94th Street. It offered about 3,000 books for checkout and was open for only two hours a week--2:00 to 4:00 on Saturdays. Like all the others it was staffed by volunteers and offered donated materials. The most recent US Census in 1950 had indicated a Lenexa population of 803. That population soon began to burgeon. When the Library’s budget allowed, the branch’s hours were increased and it was moved into a rented storefront in downtown Lenexa.

In 1967, a bond issue was approved by... Continue »

Gather at the Table

Gather at the Table

Conversation allows people to better understand different viewpoints and to build a stronger community. Gather with us to break bread and discuss Food Insecurity in Johnson County. We provide the conversation starters - and the bread - and you provide the conversation. All are welcome at this drop-in discussion. Food and drink are provided.

See all of our coming food, food budgeting, and food insecurity-related programming »

Listen to our Did You Hear? podcast to hear Ashley, Michelle, and Dave to talk about Gather at the Table.

Conversation allows people to better understand different viewpoints and to build a stronger community. Gather with us to break bread and discuss Food Insecurity in Johnson County. We provide the conversation starters - and the bread - and you provide the conversation. All are welcome at this drop-in discussion. Food and drink are provided.

See all of our coming food, food budgeting, and food insecurity-related programming »

Listen to our Did You Hear?... Continue »

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Central Resource Library
  • KC Metro area logos
    KC Metro area logos KC Metro area logos
  • Combined catalog search
    Combined catalog search Combined catalog search

Combined Catalog Update

Granted, we’re biased. But we think the Kansas City region is library-rich, boasting an array of great systems that further their pursuit of a common mission – free access to knowledge – by working together.

We’re doing it again.

In 2016, four public library systems – Kansas City, Mid-Continent, Johnson County, and Olathe – joined together on a common catalog platform called BiblioCommons, which streamlined the search, discovery, and account management experience for its users. The collaborative then introduced account linking, enabling patrons logged into one library’s catalog to access their accounts at any of the others. It allowed easy, across-the-board access to checkouts, holds, and shelf searches.

Now, we’ve further integrated the search process. If you search the catalog of one library system, you’ll automatically search the collections of the other three systems. Say you log in through the Johnson County Library and are looking for something in the Game of Thrones series. You’ll get a listing of our materials, plus a numerical prompt for what’s available at the Kansas City and Mid-Continent Library systems.

You can access their listings with an additional click.

This newest update to the service launched Tuesday, April 16. With it, library users can view millions of titles across all branches of the four participating library systems.

Things to keep in mind:

  • The branding and web addresses for each catalog will remain unchanged.
  • Each library system will continue to maintain its own borrowing policies.
  • While you can place hold requests on eligible materials from any library system, those items cannot be delivered outside the system that owns them. For example, Mid-Continent items must be picked up at a Mid-Continent location.

To get the most out of the shared catalog, sign up for cards at each library system – Kansas City, Mid-Continent, and Johnson County/Olathe – and link the accounts with a single username. Explore away! Even as you do, the four library systems are looking for ways to further expand and strengthen a productive partnership.

Granted, we’re biased. But we think the Kansas City region is library-rich, boasting an array of great systems that further their pursuit of a common mission – free access to knowledge – by working together.

We’re doing it again.

In 2016, four public library systems – Kansas City, Mid-Continent, Johnson County, and Olathe – joined together on a common catalog platform called BiblioCommons, which streamlined the search, discovery, and account management experience for its users. The collaborative then introduced account linking, enabling patrons logged into one library’s catalog to access their accounts at any of the others. It allowed easy, across-the-board... Continue »

Lenexa City Center Library Opens Sunday, June 2!

Lenexa City Center Library will open on June 2, from 1 - 5 pm. You can catch this video before the movies at Merriam Cinemark and B&B Shawnee!

Lenexa City Center Library will be the new home for Lackman Library patrons. Read more about the transition »

Lenexa City Center Library will open on June 2, from 1 - 5 pm. You can catch this video before the movies at Merriam Cinemark and B&B Shawnee!

Lenexa City Center Library will be the new home for Lackman Library patrons. Read more about the transition »

  • Girl Scouts
    Girl Scouts Girl Scouts
  • Girl Scouts
    Girl Scouts Girl Scouts
  • Girl Scouts
    Girl Scouts Girl Scouts
  • Girl Scouts
    Girl Scouts Girl Scouts
  • Girl Scouts
    Girl Scouts Girl Scouts

Gardening at Corinth

Spring is in full bloom here at Corinth! We have been hard at work with local Girl Scouts of America troop #4091 creating an educational bee and butterfly garden which features native flowering plants.

Our goal is to create an inviting and interactive experience for our patrons. By featuring plants that attract bees and butterflies, we hope to do our part in educating the public about the importance of pollinators.

This has been a wonderful opportunity to partner with our community and to share a sense of involvement and ownership with the next generation. Come by and see the ever-evolving garden for yourself!

Spring is in full bloom here at Corinth! We have been hard at work with local Girl Scouts of America troop #4091 creating an educational bee and butterfly garden which features native flowering plants.

Our goal is to create an inviting and interactive experience for our patrons. By featuring plants that attract bees and butterflies, we hope to do our part in educating the public about the importance of pollinators.

This has been a wonderful opportunity to partner with our community and to share a sense of involvement and ownership with the next generation. Come by and see the ever-evolving garden for yourself!

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