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Lazy Projector

Projecting Some Laziness Into Your Music MondayLazy Projector

Lazy Projector's lead singer and songwriter Aaron Shinn describes the band's music as indie rock "with an affinity for folk." While listeners may find their tunes more danceable and hooky than folk-based, Shinn's description isn't too far off the map. After all, the songs for the band's upcoming debut album evoco began as "acoustic-based folk songs". Descriptors aside, Lazy Projector small handful of recent singles point toward an album that promises to be your higher caliber indie pop. We are thrilled to share an interview Shinn about how these songs evolved and what else is ahead for the band in 2019. Enjoy!

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Please introduce yourself and your bandmates.

Lazy Projector currently consists of Aaron Shinn, Tell Pryor, Matthew Schorr, and Samuel Marconett. We are a Kansas City based, indie rock project with an affinity for folk.

Continue »
Red, white and blue steam rises from a coffee cup bearing a design with two conversation bubbles

Today at Corinth: Legislative CoffeeLegislative Coffee Series

Discover what's percolating in the Kansas Legislature. Representatives and Senators with constituents in Johnson County will discuss the new legislative session, followed by Q&A. You bring the questions, we provide the coffee and doughnuts. Presented with the League of Women Voters.

Panelists will include:

  • Senator Pat Pettey, District 6
  • Senator Barbara Bollier, District 7
  • Senator John Skubal, District 11
  • Representative Jerry Stogsdill, District 21
  • Representative Rui Xu, District 25

Discover what's percolating in the Kansas Legislature. Representatives and Senators with constituents in Johnson County will discuss the new legislative session, followed by Q&A. You bring the questions, we provide the coffee and doughnuts. Presented with the League of Women Voters.

Panelists will include:

  • Senator Pat Pettey, District 6
  • Senator Barbara Bollier, District 7
  • Senator John Skubal, District 11
  • Representative Jerry Stogsdill, District 21
  • Representative Rui Xu, District 25
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Corinth Library
Corinth Library Study Rooms Two study rooms that accommodate up to four people each. Study Rooms are free and may be reserved up to three months in advance, on a first-come, first served basis by students and study groups. - Spherical Image - RICOH THETA

Study Rooms? We have them!

Need a little quiet? Want a small space to collaborate and communicate? Two words: Study Rooms. They are free and may be reserved up to three months in advance, on a first-come, first served basis by students, study groups or anyone at all!

AVA:"Huh. Study rooms."

BOB: "Are you an interior designer?"

AVA: "No, why?"

BOB: "Then why do you want to study rooms?"

AVA: "You're not funny."

We're here to help you make this your best school year ever!

Need a little quiet? Want a small space to collaborate and communicate? Two words: Study Rooms. They are free and may be reserved up to three months in advance, on a first-come, first served basis by students, study groups or anyone at all!

AVA:"Huh. Study rooms."

BOB: "Are you an interior designer?"

AVA: "No, why?"

BOB: "Then why do you want to study rooms?"

AVA: "You're not funny."

We're here to help you make this your best school year ever!

Milk Judging team in 1938

Milking Throwback Thursday

Got milk? Like to judge things? Hop in a time machine and join 1938's Shawnee Mission Rural High School Milk Judging Team!

We like to occasionally give a nod to the odd.

For even more local history visit jocohistory.org or follow our hashtag on Twitter.

Got milk? Like to judge things? Hop in a time machine and join 1938's Shawnee Mission Rural High School Milk Judging Team!

We like to occasionally give a nod to the odd.

For even more local history visit jocohistory.org or follow our hashtag on Twitter.

  • Kwanza Humphrey
    Kwanza Humphrey Kwanza Humphrey
  • Kwanza Humphrey
    Kwanza Humphrey Kwanza Humphrey
  • Kwanza Humphrey
    Kwanza Humphrey Kwanza Humphrey
  • Kwanza Humphrey
    Kwanza Humphrey Kwanza Humphrey

Now at Corinth: Kwanza HumphreyKwanza Humphrey

Monday, Jan 7, 2019 to Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at Corinth Library

Kwanza Humphrey has been painting for over 25 years. A lifelong resident of Kansas City, Humphrey calls his artistic process a “human centered design approach.” Through his portraits, Humphrey scratches below the surface to show the essence and emotion of humanity. As he states about his creative process: “Painting is an emotional experience for me, so much so that it’s hard to put into words the way I work. Sometimes I have a conversation with myself and shape a feeling. Other times I just let go and let my subconscious take over where color and brush are the medium I use to communicate.”

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Introduce yourself and describe your work and the genre you work in.

I've been painting and making art for as long as I remember. I started drawing very early, around 2-3, and have been painting since about 1996. I'm always trying to learn something new and hone my craft. I paint figure's and portraits mostly in a painterly style to show how I paint rather than just what I paint. 

 

Talk about the work on view. What would you like people to know about it? 

You will find a collection of drawings and paintings. Drawing is my first love. Each painting starts as a study for me. I use pencil and paper to figure out tone and composition before I commit it to canvas.

 

What’s the most challenging thing about your creative process?

Time and energy are the most challenging. I have a day job that pay's the bills and its hard to find time after working all day to commit to the studio. Once I'm painting thought, 9 times out of 10 the art gives me energy.

 

What is about people and the human form that you find so captivating? 

We're all very different, but we have very familiar experiences in our life. Though look different we all experience human emotions and can recognize those feelings in each other. In that way I think we are more alike than different. 

 

What do you wish to convey when working on a portrait of someone?

I try to capture the essence of that person. I think in general we guard ourselves and where mask's. When I paint people I try to move past that and show some of the emotions we all feel. 

 

What are your book/music/movie recommendations for checkout from the library? Why?

I would recommend any of the books by Malcolm Gladwell. He offers insightful perspective on the human condition in various aspects that can help you understand the world we live in or at least look at it differently.

 

Also, could you provide a paragraph or so for an artist statement? 

I have been painting for over 25 years. I grew up here in Kansas City, graduating high school from Lincoln Academy. It was there I was encouraged to pursue art as a profession from Ms Claire Martin-West. I attended Missouri Western State University where I took several painting classes from Jack Hughes. His approach was very hands off unless you were really needing help. I appreciated his approach as it allowed me to develop my own voice. I graduated from there in ‘98 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Commercial Art with an emphasis in painting and illustration. My first exhibition was at the Albrecht Kemper membership show in ’96 where I won best of show for my painting “Blue Funk.” My painting “Ms Flora” won an award in the 35th Annual River market Regional Exhibition, curated by Mr Curlee Ravon Holton, Executive Director, David C. Driskell Center.

Kwanza Humphrey has been painting for over 25 years. A lifelong resident of Kansas City, Humphrey calls his artistic process a “human centered design approach.” Through his portraits, Humphrey scratches below the surface to show the essence and emotion of humanity. As he states about his creative process: “Painting is an emotional experience for me, so much so that it’s hard to put into words the way I work. Sometimes I have a conversation with myself and shape a feeling. Other times I just let go and let my subconscious take over where color and brush are the medium I use to communicate.”

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Introduce yourself and describe your work and the genre you work in.

I've been painting and making art for as... Continue »

Race Project KC

Race Project KC

Race Project KC

Learn about the work Johnson County librarians have been coordinating for high school students on the history of race in our area and consider ways to participate.

Whether we want to or not, we all live inside filter bubbles. Our experience of the world is limited by filters beyond our control. This happens online and in every aspect of our lives. Our physical locations, jobs, interpersonal networks, cultures, and much more not only give us our identities, they also limit, and segregate.

We do, however, have choices about how we respond to those filters. The book Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America helps us make those choices. The book relates author Tanner Colby’s explorations into racial filters in the U.S., and delves into the Kansas City metro area's history of racial segregation.

Tanner Colby discussed his book at  Blue Valley North High School, Johnson County Community College, and Johnson County Library in the Fall of 2014. Race Project KC emerged after this visit, as local educators and Library staff were inspired to extend his work into experiences for area teens for them to learn how our community has come to its current state of racial segregation and for them to break out of some of their bubbles. The initiative has been expanding since.

The initiative now consists of a series of opportunities for students to learn our area's history of racial segregation and how it continues to impact us today. Students hear from experts on the topics, learn vocabulary for talking about race, build relationships with peers they might not otherwise meet, and share their own stories as they relate to the issues.

Ten high schools from the Kansas City metro area are participating during the 2018-2019 school year. Most schools opt into attending monthly workshops with a partner school from a different part of the city. The Library collaborates with educators, subject experts, authors, and community partners to provide these workshops. 

During the fall of 2018, students:

  • Explored how we can turn data into story, and worked with the creators of the Redlined comic books to interpret the Health Equity Action Transformation report into their own three panel comics.

  • Watched two films by KC native Carrie Hawks, black enuf* and Delilah, and participated with Carrie Hawks in a storytelling workshop lead by Kansas City Public Library staff.

  • Visited the Nelson-Atkins Museum's displays including featured exhibition Napoleon: Power and Splendor to explore dominant narratives of art history. They then made their own re-mixed self-portraits with local artist Heinrich Toh.

The spring of 2019 will see a similar set of experiences, culminating in an event with author Tanner Colby and fellow authors Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jacqueline Woodson. In the meantime, you can take the audio tour, Dividing Lines: The History of Segregation in Kansas City.

 

Race Project KC is generously supported by Johnson County Library Foundation, and Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area. Visit Race Project KC online. 

Race Project KC

Learn about the work Johnson County librarians have been coordinating for high school students on the history of race in our area and consider ways to participate.

Whether we want to or not, we all live inside filter bubbles. Our experience of the world is limited by filters beyond our control. This happens online and in every aspect of our lives. Our physical locations, jobs, interpersonal networks, cultures, and much more not only give us our identities, they also limit, and segregate.

We do, however, have choices about how we respond to those filters. The book... Continue »

Football

Are you ready for some football?

#WeAreWellRed

You might just cheer at the top of your lungs when you learn how your Library Card raises your game to a Championship level!

We get it, this is new territory. The Chiefs aren't normally playing this time of year. Perhaps you're confused. You don't know what to do or how to handle it. The Library is here to say, "SNAP OUT OF IT!" This is serious stuff!!! You can win!!!

Your playbook? Food, Friends, Fun!

FOOD:

Two words: Souper Bowl

Cook up some success Kansas City-style with Mike Mills recipes, secrets, tall tales and outright lies: Peace, Love and Barbecue.

Extra point: The New England Soup Factory Cookbook by Majorie Druker. More than 100 of the best soup recipes Boston has to offer accompanied by fun stories and beautiful full-color photography.

FRIENDS:

As the late great Dionne Warwick sang: "In good times and bad times, I'll be on your side forever more. That's what friends are for."

Field goal: Commencement by J. Courtney Sullivan. Four people meet at a Massachusetts college and become strong friends. Through ups and downs, they all reunite years after graduation, surviving changing relationships, family, and circumstances. Filled with warmth, wit and humor.

Two-point conversion: My Friend is Sad by Mo Willems. When Gerald the Elephant (Tom Brady) is sad, Piggie (Pattrick Mahommes) is determined cheer him up ... 

FUN:

Touchdown: Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh. Simply the greatest book ever written.

 

#WeAreWellRed

You might just cheer at the top of your lungs when you learn how your Library Card raises your game to a Championship level!

We get it, this is new territory. The Chiefs aren't normally playing this time of year. Perhaps you're confused. You don't know what to do or how to handle it. The Library is here to say, "SNAP OUT OF IT!" This is serious stuff!!! You can win!!!

Your playbook? Food, Friends, Fun!... Continue »

Sunflowers

Kansas Day Series: Hidden History of Kansas

Author Adrian Zink will tell the story of Kentucky Derby winning horse Lawrin and his Prairie Village roots.

Check out the other Kansas Day Series events!

Author Adrian Zink will tell the story of Kentucky Derby winning horse Lawrin and his Prairie Village roots.

Check out the other Kansas Day Series events!

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Corinth Library
Red, white and blue steam rises from a coffee cup bearing a design with two conversation bubbles

Legislative Coffee

Discover what's percolating in the Kansas Legislature. Representatives and Senators with constituents in Johnson County will discuss the new legislative session, followed by Q&A. You bring the questions, we provide the coffee and doughnuts. See the full schedule »

Presented with the League of Women Voters.

 

Discover what's percolating in the Kansas Legislature. Representatives and Senators with constituents in Johnson County will discuss the new legislative session, followed by Q&A. You bring the questions, we provide the coffee and doughnuts. See the full schedule »

Presented with the League of Women Voters.

 

  • Joseph Jurkiewicz
    Joseph Jurkiewicz Joseph Jurkiewicz
  • Joseph Jurkiewicz
    Joseph Jurkiewicz Joseph Jurkiewicz
  • Joseph Jurkiewicz
    Joseph Jurkiewicz Joseph Jurkiewicz

Now at Oak Park: Joseph JurkiewiczJoseph Jurkiewicz

Monday, Jan 7, 2019 to Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at Oak Park Library

Joe Jurkiewicz is a visual artist whose paintings explore themes of desire, loneliness, anxiety and exaltation. Pulling influences from street art and fashion illustration, he creates perplexing surreal imagery developed in sketchbooks, where he explores new ideas, mark making and surrounding influences. He graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute of May 2016 with a major in Illustration.

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What would you like people to know most about your art? 

That my work comes from my imagination. I find joy and catharsis while creating art and I want people to feel that in some way.

 

What is your creative process, and what is the most challenging part?  The most rewarding?

My creative process mainly comes from the element of play. I tend to have fun while creating art-not holding to any standards or having any fear of the end result. I simply allow my work to become what it is intended.

 

From where do you gain inspiration?  

Almost anything and everything. Talking to people, listening to music, playing video games, watching movies and drawing what I see.

 

What wisdom/insight would you share with your past self if you could?

Haha I would tell myself to draw more and work harder. I was young, lazy and didn’t know that hard work would pay off.

 

If you could recommend a book, musical artist/track/album, and movie what would they be?

Book I would recommend “start with why” by Simon Sinek. Japanese DJ producer Nujabes. Movie to watch is “Requiem for a Dream”. A must!

Joe Jurkiewicz is a visual artist whose paintings explore themes of desire, loneliness, anxiety and exaltation. Pulling influences from street art and fashion illustration, he creates perplexing surreal imagery developed in sketchbooks, where he explores new ideas, mark making and surrounding influences. He graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute of May 2016 with a major in Illustration.

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What would you like people to know most about your art? 

That my work comes from my imagination. I find joy and catharsis while creating art and I want people to feel that in some way.

 

What is your creative process, and what is the most challenging part?  The most rewarding?... Continue »

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