Bookmarkable

Barb Nichols is a Johnson County Library Foundation supporter.

Why I Give: A Story by Barbara Nichols

I am a self-proclaimed word nerd and book geek. Nothing makes me happier than being in the middle of a good book and knowing there is another one waiting for me. The credit for this must go to my mother, a voracious reader and library patron. She had a love of reading and a limited budget; the library provided the perfect solution.

Every Tuesday night was library night for my mom, my sister and me. It was such a thrill to go to the Children’s Section by myself and pick out the books I wanted. As time passed, I fell in love with mysteries, classic fiction, plays and cookbooks. And where could I find all of these for free? At the library!

To pass on the love of reading, I started taking our sons to the Corinth Library from a very young age. Miss Uppie and  Miss Leslie were the librarians and always had a smile and if needed, recommendations. We attended many programs such as “Reading with your Pet,” “Origami” and “Pokeman Parties.”  Our boys, now 27 and 24, still use and love the library. Our oldest uses the Johnson County Library online resources frequently and our youngest, who now lives in New York, had to call a week after he moved to tell me that he had been to the New York Public Library to get his card.

To quote Lady Bird Johnson, “Perhaps no place in any community is so totally democratic as the town library. The only entrance requirement is interest.”

Libraries represent a great equalizer in our society. All are welcome and encouraged to become patrons. They provide books, magazines, genealogy information, meeting rooms, Maker Spaces, Internet access, author talks and a variety of programs. My book club reserves a meeting room once a year to plan out what we want to read.  We can stroll through the stacks and chose titles and topics of interest to share with the group. 

People say that no one reads “actual” books anymore, yet the Johnson County Library system checks out more than 7,000,000 items a year. Many of those items are eBooks, and I do appreciate the convenience of reading on my iPad, but nothing beats having a real book in your hands. As our world changes, so does the library. It continues to evolve, grow and provide wonderful resources for our community.

Why do I give to the Johnson County Library Foundation? I believe that in any great society we need access to free materials across all economic barriers, and the Library provides that service in our community. It is important to me to be involved and support the important work and programs throughout this system.

- Barbara  Nichols is a Johnson County Library Foundation supporter.

I am a self-proclaimed word nerd and book geek. Nothing makes me happier than being in the middle of a good book and knowing there is another one waiting for me. The credit for this must go to my mother, a voracious reader and library patron. She had a love of reading and a limited budget; the library provided the perfect solution.

Every Tuesday night was library night for my mom, my sister and me. It was such a thrill to go to the Children’s Section by myself and pick out the books I wanted. As time passed, I fell in love with mysteries, classic fiction, plays and cookbooks. And where could I find all of these for free? At the library!

To pass on the love of reading, I started taking our sons to the Corinth Library from a... Continue »

The winners of the 2018 Bookmark Design Contest were presented to the Library Board at the April 12, 2018 meeting.

2018 Bookmark Design Contest Winners Announced2018 Bookmark Design Contest Winners

The Friends of Johnson County Library recently announced the winners of the annual Bookmark Design Contest. The contest commemorated National Library Week 2018 and the winners were presented to the Library Board at the April 12, 2018 meeting.

Sponsored by the Friends of Johnson County Library, the annual design competition contest accepts original  illustrations in seven age categories from Preschool to Adult. Accepted media are colored pencil; marker; crayon; gouache; tempera; oil; acrylic; finger-paint; chalk; watercolor; pen-and-ink; on paper only. Designs, drawings and images must be made by hand only. 

Jurors for the event included Friends of Johnson County Library board members and JCL Children’s librarians. The winning illustrations are printed as bookmarks and distributed during the year at the 13 – soon to be 14 –  branches of the Johnson County Library and at the 3 Friends bookstores. More than 6000 bookmarks will find homes between pages by the end of the year.

“They’re so wonderful,” exclaims Friends president Julie Steiner, “and I collect a new set every year. They’re a great way to get creative people of all ages interested in our excellent Library system.”

Library patrons may begin collecting their new bookmarks now at their nearest Johnson County Library. The contest is generously supported by the Friends of Johnson County Library.

 

Pictured in photo:
Back: L-R: Julie Steiner, Friends President; Ron Shaffer, Board of County Commissioners, 1st District; Jack Warner, Adult category.
Middle: L-R: Thea Price, Grades 9-12; Ramona Lockridge, Grades 3-4; Molly McCartan, Grades 5-6; Avery Karl, Grades 5-6; Riley McConnell, Grades 7-8
Front: L-R: Katherine Feng, Grades 1-2; Lindsey Phipps, Grades 1-2; Olivia Wang, Grades 3-4.

Unavailable for photo: Isaiah He, Pre-K; Grace Bonifield, Grades 9-12

The Friends of Johnson County Library recently announced the winners of the annual Bookmark Design Contest. The contest commemorated National Library Week 2018 and the winners were presented to the Library Board at the April 12, 2018 meeting.

Sponsored by the Friends of Johnson County Library, the annual design competition contest accepts original  illustrations in seven age categories from Preschool to Adult. Accepted media are colored pencil; marker; crayon; gouache; tempera; oil; acrylic; finger-paint; chalk; watercolor; pen-and-ink; on paper only. Designs, drawings and images must be made by hand only. 

Jurors for the event included Friends of Johnson County Library board members and JCL Children’s librarians. The... Continue »

Summer Reading at Johnson County Library Rocks!

This Summer, Libraries Rock!

Summer Reading for kids, teens and families
May 21 - July 31

Year-round readers have more fun! We're encouraging school-aged families - and everyone else - to read for fun this summer. Our special summer programs and events help Johnson County readers of every age to have meaningful (and sometimes meaningless) experiences.

Each Summer Reading participant receives a prize book just for registering with our program. Stop by any Johnson County Library location starting May 21 to pick-up your free book and a summer reading log to track your summer reading.

This program is generously supported by the Friends of the Johnson County Library and the Johnson County Library Foundation.

Summer Reading for kids, teens and families
May 21 - July 31

Year-round readers have more fun! We're encouraging school-aged families - and everyone else - to read for fun this summer. Our special summer programs and events help Johnson County readers of every age to have meaningful (and sometimes meaningless) experiences.

Each Summer Reading participant receives a prize book just for registering with our program. Stop by any Johnson County Library location starting May 21 to pick-up your free book and a summer reading log to track your summer reading.

This program is generously supported by the Friends of the Johnson County Library and the Johnson... Continue »

The cover of our  2018 Summer Guide features art by local artist, Gavin Snider.

Libraries Rock!

The cover of our Summer Guide features art by local Gavin Snider. He depicted both Kansas City music legends and current musicians in our Listen Local collection. 

By day, Gavin Snider is a designer at Jonathan Schloss / Architect. By night, he plays music and draws for Sad American Night, a band that doubles as a visual art project. Gavin also creates artwork (posters, albums, t-shirts, etc.) for a number of other local musicians and organizations. His illustrations draw on a strange reservoir of childhood memories, constant exploration of Kansas City and New York, mythology and anthropology uncovered in dusty library books, travel, a lifelong fascination with architecture and place-making, and perhaps most importantly, the storytelling and wonder inherent to the music that inspires his drawings.

Stop by any Johnson County Library location to pick up your free Summer Guide. It's full of lots of programs for the whole family and, plenty of music to go along with the theme: "Libraries Rock!" From Listen Local live performances with local Kansas City musicians, to Movies in the Park, to "Meet the Artists" events, the Library offers fun summer activities for readers of every age!

The cover of our Summer Guide features art by local Gavin Snider. He depicted both Kansas City music legends and current musicians in our Listen Local collection. 

By day, Gavin Snider is a designer at Jonathan Schloss / Architect. By night, he plays music and draws for Sad American Night, a band that doubles as a visual art project. Gavin also creates artwork (posters, albums, t-shirts, etc.) for a number of other local musicians and organizations. His illustrations draw on a strange reservoir of childhood memories, constant exploration of Kansas City and New York, mythology and anthropology uncovered in dusty library books, travel, a lifelong fascination with... Continue »

Dividing Lines: A History of Segregation in Kansas City

A History of Segregation in Kansas City

Dividing Lines: A History of Segregation in Kansas City

Download the new Dividing Lines app on Android or iOS and journey through the history of segregation in the Kansas City metro, primarily through its real estate. The tour is designed so that you can safely drive through the city at your own pace while hearing stories about each area you travel through.

Nathaniel Bozarth, ethnographer and host of the “Wide Ruled” podcast, narrates this 90-minute drive, bringing in interviews from several area students and notable city figures Sid Willens, Bill Tammeus, Mamie Hughes, and Margaret May.

“Dividing Lines” was created as a part of the Johnson County Library’s “Race Project KC.” The Library’s Civic Engagement Committee and Tanner Colby’s book “Some of My Best Friends are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America” inspired much of the ongoing work of Race Project KC. This tour was made possible by support from Johnson County Library and the Kansas Humanities Council. It was produced by Brainroot Light & Sound. Written by Nathaniel Bozarth and Christopher Cook. The tour features music from Hermon Mehari and KC Jazz LP.

The content of this tour may contain controversial material; such statements are not an expression of library policy.

Get more information and download the app now.

More from Race Project KC:

Our upcoming panel, East is East and West is West on April 19 at 6:30pm, is sold out. You can join in the waiting list, or watch Facebook during the event for a livestream. Thanks to American Public Square for cosponsoring this event, which includes panelists Mayor Sly James, author Tanner Colby, civil rights attorney Authur Benson, Chief Diversity and Professional Development Officer Michelle Wimes, and moderator Steve Kraske of the Kansas City Star and KCUR.

Dividing Lines: A History of Segregation in Kansas City

Download the new Dividing Lines app on Android or iOS and journey through the history of segregation in the Kansas City metro, primarily through its real estate. The tour is designed so that you can safely drive through the city at your own pace while hearing stories about each area you travel through.

Nathaniel Bozarth, ethnographer and host of the “Wide Ruled” podcast, narrates this 90-minute drive, bringing in interviews from several area students and notable city figures Sid Willens, Bill Tammeus, Mamie Hughes, and Margaret... Continue »

books to go logo

Books to Go!

We've got Books to Go kits on a lot of topics, so when you're in a hurry to grab some fun reading and activities for your little ones, we've got your back! Books to Go kits include audiobooks, books, activity suggestions and more all in one. Whether your little one's current obsessions is weather, opposites, or bugs, we've got those fun topics and many more!  

We've got Books to Go kits on a lot of topics, so when you're in a hurry to grab some fun reading and activities for your little ones, we've got your back! Books to Go kits include audiobooks, books, activity suggestions and more all in one. Whether your little one's current obsessions is weather, opposites, or bugs, we've got those fun topics and many more!  

The word poetry is spelled out with book covers

Tonight: Poetry and ProsePoetry and Prose

Listen to locally and nationally known writers present their poetry and prose. The Thomas Zvi Wilson Reading Series is cosponsored by The Writers Place.

April: HC Palmer and Kevin Rabas 

Listen to locally and nationally known writers present their poetry and prose. The Thomas Zvi Wilson Reading Series is cosponsored by The Writers Place.

April: HC Palmer and Kevin Rabas 

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Central Resource Library , Carmack Community Room
Mark your calendar!

This Week at the Library

Did you know each of our locations has book groups? We also offer more than 40 storytimes each week across all of our libraries. We have events for Makers from beginners through specialists, and if you're a job seeker or looking for some help with your tech questions, we've got your back, too. See you at the Library!

Did you know each of our locations has book groups? We also offer more than 40 storytimes each week across all of our libraries. We have events for Makers from beginners through specialists, and if you're a job seeker or looking for some help with your tech questions, we've got your back, too. See you at the Library!

elementia cover xv

Celebrate Creative Teens

Join us at the reception celebrating the release of elementia issue xv!

Thursday, April 26
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Arts and Heritage Center

The Johnson County Museum is extending their hours for us. Stop by between 4:30 and 6 pm, for free entrance to the museum to see the current exhibitions! Then, at 6:30 pm, take a free copy of the new issue and look at this year’s art on display while you enjoy refreshments and performances by local teens. At 7:30 pm, we begin our readings from teen poets with a keynote talk by A.S. King. Books by King will be available after the reception for purchase and signing. Find more details and RSVP online

Copies of issue xv will be available for free in all Johnson County Library locations and on our website starting Friday, April 27.

elementia is a literary arts magazine published to represent and uplift young adults. We accept original poetry, fiction, nonfiction, graphic stories, photography and illustrations. Join us at the reception celebrating the release of issue xv! Continue »

April Fiction Roundup

April's Hottest Fiction Pics from Readers Advisory Librarian Gregg

Hello and welcome to our new releases roundup for Fiction for the month of April, 2018! If this is your first time here, my name is Gregg and I’m a Readers’ Advisory librarian here at the Johnson County Library. I’ll take a brief look at some of the well-reviewed titles that are published this month that we’ve either read or have heard great things about. You’ll not find John Grisham, Michael Connelly, or Janet Evanovich on these lists. It’s not that we don’t like them – we do! – but those are authors who most folks have already heard of. We love spotlighting books and authors that you might not be familiar with, or are brand new and deserve a bit of attention. Feel free to tell us about the under-the-radar titles that you’re excited about.

Mixing together historical fiction and psychological thriller – two literary tastes that go well together - is Christine Mangan’s TANGERINE. Set mostly on 1950s Morocco, this twisty novel about jealousy and identity involves two friends from different social classes who knew each other from boarding school who meet again in Tangiers, Africa. Alice is in an unhappy marriage, new to the area, and terrified to leave her home, while the more carefree and mysterious Lucy suddenly appears and helps her discover the markets, cafes, and beautiful streets outside her home. But the friends share a dark secret from their past, and when Alice’s husband, John, suddenly disappears, Alice and Lucy’s dysfunctional relationship threatens to consume them all. Lushly written and with a strong sense of place – the description of Tangier’s twisty, languid streets and bustling markets will make you run to travel websites to look up the cost of flights to Morocco - this will please fans of Suzanne Rindell’s THE OTHER TYPIST and Erin Kelly’s THE POISON TREE.

Keeping with the historical fiction theme but going back a few years – well, okay, more like a few thousand years – is Madeline Miller’s glittering, brilliant CIRCE, destined to be a 2018 book club favorite. Based on the character in Homer’s Odyssey who’s mostly known for turning men into pigs, Miller transforms the story into a thoughtful exploration of feminism, isolationism, and above all, the ability to change. Born the daughter of the immortal race of Titans, Circe is very much a disappointment, not as beautiful as her mother or as powerful as her father, Helios, a sun god. Trying to find a place in this world on her own terms, she is exiled to an isolated island for the crime of discovering and learning a form of forbidden magic. When a Greek general from the Trojan War washes up on her shore, she must choose between the unchanging gods or the chaotic, squabbling mortals she has a fondness for. Personally, this one’s going right to the top of my best of the year list, and I don’t see it moving off that particular spot anytime soon. If you haven’t already, be sure to pick up Miller’s SONG OF ACHILLES, about the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus that altered the course of the Trojan War, which is equally as good as this one.

As a proud member of Generation X, I fondly remember going to the library as a young reader to browse the “Choose Your Own Adventure” novels, which were adventure or mystery stories that required you to make choices that altered the plot as you went forward. (We still have some in our collection if you’re curious!) Sadly, you don’t see many of those for adults. But Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris’ MY LADY’S CHOOSING mixes the ability to choose your own twists and turns of the story with a rollicking Regency-style historical romance. As the novel begins, you’re new to the courtship season, and you have an array of suitors in front of you. Do you choose a rugged Scottish Highlander? The dashing but scandalous rogue? Or the handsome but reluctant Lord? The authors fill the pages with a wonderful mix of wit, romance, and baudy humor, while keeping true to the classic romances that fans around the world love. This one’s a guaranteed crowd pleaser, and we won’t mind if you mark your page with a finger, skip ahead, and see what happens if you took another path - we’ve all done it!

The best novels about Big Important Topics will often take heavy, abstract concepts and boil them down to the personal level. Authors who write characters we relate to and can get behind provide a lens through which we can see those Big Important Topics and make them relatable and understandable. Jonathan Evison’s LAWN BOY introduces us to Mike Munoz, a young man who just got fired from an entry-level gig on a landscaping crew in an affluent Washington state suburb. Mike doesn’t have a lot of things going for him. He’s poor, lives on a reservation, his mom works double shifts to help keep the family afloat, and his brother has special needs. The deck is stacked against him, but the does have enthusiasm, a quick wit, and determination, and he tries and tries - and fails - to chip away at a small piece of the American Dream. One day, however, he catches the break that he’s long sought. Mike Munoz is a memorable character and this coming-of-age story is full of warm humor and big heart, and readers will quickly grow to love him and his observations on class, race, and culture as he looks from the outside in – and finally breaks through.

Hello and welcome to our new releases roundup for Fiction for the month of April, 2018! If this is your first time here, my name is Gregg and I’m a Readers’ Advisory librarian here at the Johnson County Library. I’ll take a brief look at some of the well-reviewed titles that are published this month that we’ve either read or have heard great things about. You’ll not find John Grisham, Michael Connelly, or Janet Evanovich on these lists. It’s not that we don’t like them – we do! – but those are authors who most folks have already heard of. We love spotlighting books and authors that you might not be familiar with, or are brand new and deserve a bit of attention. Feel free to tell us about the under-the-radar titles that you’re excited... Continue »

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