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Never Too Old For Stories

Never Too Old For Stories

You're never too old to listen to a good story. Storyteller Christine Henderson shares her favorite folktales, fairy tales and tall tales. Best for ages 2 years and up with a caregiver, and fun for the whole family.

Space is limited for this popular program, so arrive early for your seat.

You're never too old to listen to a good story. Storyteller Christine Henderson shares her favorite folktales, fairy tales and tall tales. Best for ages 2 years and up with a caregiver, and fun for the whole family.

Space is limited for this popular program, so arrive early for your seat.

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Corinth Library
Silent Book Group

Shhhh! Silent Book GroupSilent Book Group

Silent Book Group invites you to bring your own book and spend time reading with others. No book assignment or discussion. It's book group fun minus the pressure. A librarian will be present to recommend new titles for you. The Silent Book Group meets at Groundhouse Coffee, 103 S. Elm St., Gardner, KS 66030.

Silent Book Group invites you to bring your own book and spend time reading with others. No book assignment or discussion. It's book group fun minus the pressure. A librarian will be present to recommend new titles for you. The Silent Book Group meets at Groundhouse Coffee, 103 S. Elm St., Gardner, KS 66030.

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Gardner Library , Off-site
The 1954 “All-Electric House” decked out for Christmas, at Johnson County Museum.

Throwback Thursday Mid-Century Christmas

Each year, Johnson County Museum staff transform the All-Electric House’s interior and exterior into a Mid-century Christmas wonderland, placing holiday touches throughout the home that make it appear as though a 1950s family lives there. Christmas cookie cutters in the kitchen. A child’s red velvet dress in the nursery. A Santa hat hanging on the bedpost. And of course, the iconic aluminum Christmas tree, front and center in the living room. Read more and see more at jocohistory >>

Each year, Johnson County Museum staff transform the All-Electric House’s interior and exterior into a Mid-century Christmas wonderland, placing holiday touches throughout the home that make it appear as though a 1950s family lives there. Christmas cookie cutters in the kitchen. A child’s red velvet dress in the nursery. A Santa hat hanging on the bedpost. And of course, the iconic aluminum Christmas tree, front and center in the living room. Read more and see more at jocohistory >>

  • Fractured Fabrics
    Fractured Fabrics Fractured Fabrics
  • Fractured Fabrics
    Fractured Fabrics Fractured Fabrics
  • Fractured Fabrics
    Fractured Fabrics Fractured Fabrics
  • Fractured Fabrics
    Fractured Fabrics Fractured Fabrics
  • Fractured fabrics
    Fractured Fabrics Fractured fabrics

Now at Cedar Roe: Fractured FabricsFractured Fabrics

Saturday, Sep 1, 2018 to Saturday, Dec 22, 2018 at Cedar Roe Library

The Fractured Fabric Society (FFS) at Harper's Fabric and Quilt Co. in Downtown Overland Park is a group of non-traditional quilters who meet to share projects, resources and ideas in an encouraging environment. Show and Tell is a major part of the gathering, along with new techniques and topics of interest. In their 14th year, FFS members meet at Harper’s Fabric & Quilt Co. in Downtown Overland Park. Exhibiting artists are JoEl Vogt, Mary Funk, Gayle Baddeley, Mary Kay Fosnacht, Karen Hansen, Kathleen McDaniel, Jackie Stoaks and Cindy Brendzel.

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Introduce the group and tell us a little about the Fractured Fabrics Society.

Fractured Fabrics is a non-traditional art quilting group that meets at the Harpers Quilting and Fabrics store on Santa Fe in downtown Overland Park 4 times a year.

 

Talk about the work that will be on view. What would you like people to know about it?

Each piece is an original work of art designed and constructed by the artist based on their unique vision and inspiration.

 

What’s the most challenging thing about the creative process for art quilting?

The most challenging thing about art quilting is translating a vision into fabric, thread and embellishments and producing a finished piece that engages the viewer.

 

Who are the other KC-area quilters the group looks to for inspiration?

While there are many quilter’s groups in the KC-area Fractured Fabrics is one the few organizations to encourage its members to express themselves with new and innovative techniques.

 

The Fractured Fabric Society (FFS) at Harper's Fabric and Quilt Co. in Downtown Overland Park is a group of non-traditional quilters who meet to share projects, resources and ideas in an encouraging environment. Show and Tell is a major part of the gathering, along with new techniques and topics of interest. In their 14th year, FFS members meet at Harper’s Fabric & Quilt Co. in Downtown Overland Park. Exhibiting artists are JoEl Vogt, Mary Funk, Gayle Baddeley, Mary Kay Fosnacht, Karen Hansen, Kathleen McDaniel, Jackie Stoaks and Cindy Brendzel.

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Introduce the group and tell us a little about the Fractured Fabrics Society.

Fractured Fabrics is a non-traditional... Continue »

Put a Book in a Child's Hands

Today is #GivingTuesday -- which kicks off the charitable season when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. This year, your Giving Tuesday gift to the JCL Foundation will directly benefit the Library’s ever-popular Summer Reading Program, and put a book in the hands of a child!

From mid-May until the end of July, Johnson County Library helps combat summer slide by providing a free book to every child who signs up with the reading program. Having books at home is strongly linked with academic achievement. By growing children’s personal libraries and helping them find intrinsic value in reading, the library bridges that summer learning gap and invests in the future of our community.

The Library gave away 18,823 books to kids throughout Johnson County this past summer, in comparison to 15,000 in 2017. And that increase is with no additional locations. With the recent opening of our new Monticello Library, we project 22,000 books will be distributed in summer 2019.

Your gift on this Giving Tuesday will directly support this critical service for kids and their families throughout Johnson County. All donations make a difference, for example, $25 buys 5 books!

And today,  your donation can go even further if you use the donate button on our Foundation's Facebook page

On #GivingTuesday, Facebook is partnering with PayPal to match up to $7 million in donations to eligible US-based nonprofits. Donations made on the Foundation’s Facebook page will be matched, dollar-per-dollar starting at 7 a.m. on November 27 (only) and will continue until matching funds run out.   

Happy Holidays and thank you for your continued support of our mission for lifelong learning.

 

Today is #GivingTuesday -- which kicks off the charitable season when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. This year, your Giving Tuesday gift to the JCL Foundation will directly benefit the Library’s ever-popular Summer Reading Program, and put a book in the hands of a child!

From mid-May until the end of July, Johnson County Library helps combat summer slide by providing a free book to every child who signs up with the reading program. Having books at home is strongly linked with academic achievement. By growing children’s personal libraries and helping them find intrinsic value in reading, the library bridges that... Continue »

More books

Picture This

You are busy. We get that. We try our best to accommodate your sometimes hectic schedule to make your life super convenient. The Library is on your side!

But what to read? Good question! Not to brag, but this is kinda our thing! Let's find you something good. 

  • Staff Picks. Find out what we recommend. Here you'll find reviews by librarians of titles in every format we carry! You can browse by category and tags.
  • Find out the latest hub-bub with the most recent user-submitted ratings and reviews.
  • New season, so check out all of our new titles.
  • Only have time for the best of the best? We get you. We have all the books that win awards.
  • What about bestsellers? Sure. We've always got those too.
  • Need to be motivated by other readers? Join a book group!    

Your Library Card is a powerful thing!
 

You are busy. We get that. We try our best to accommodate your sometimes hectic schedule to make your life super convenient. The Library is on your side!

  • Leslie Norman Hubble
    Leslie Norman Hubble Leslie Norman Hubble
  • Leslie Norman Hubble
    Leslie Norman Hubble Leslie Norman Hubble
  • Leslie Norman Hubble
    Leslie Norman Hubble Leslie Norman Hubble

Now at Corinth: Leslie Norman HubbleLeslie Norman Hubble

Friday, Sep 21, 2018 to Friday, Dec 21, 2018 at Corinth Library

Leslie Norman Hubble’s work is inspired by content that disturbs her. She then constructs or manipulates those ideas into aesthetic images and objects.  She works to express a truth and raise questions about “mind and body, as well as concepts of time, culture, and technology.”

Hubble’s exhibition is part of the No Divide KC documentary series premiering at Johnson County Library September through December. 

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Introduce yourself and describe your work and the media/genre you work in.

My name is Leslie Norman Hubble, and I do art in a variety of media, including, acrylic painting, drawing, collage, assemblage, photography, photo manipulation, work with found objects, and combinations thereof. Virtually nothing is off limits to use as or be used in participation with a medium.

 

Talk about the work that will be on view. What would you like people to know about it?

For some time now, I have been inspired by unnerving  content . I feel compelled to construct and/or manipulate more aesthetic images or objects based on disturbing content. This works to express a truth in me and elicit  less conventional ways of seeing  the body/ mind/ spirit as well as concepts of time, culture, and technology.

For example, my husband died of COPD, a long extremely unpleasant illness. We were married for over 25 years.  Of course,  what happened to him, and what was happening to us, in our home, was extremely difficult. I took care of him, along, so was very intimate with so many aspects of the disease. Since his death I find myself doing a lot of related  art..  Cor Pulmonade ,  Sister Cor Pulmonade,  and Nebulizer Babies I and II appear in this show.   I used his xrays, MRIs, and parts of his medical records and researched images of end-stage lung disease and related conditions that  he developed. I also used  detritus used for his care (for example, one of his hospital bracelets is used in the assemblage Sister Cor Pulmonade and an oxygen tubing connector in another piece). The finished pieces are a more “palatable” version of the physical and emotional events of this time

Sonogram Doll, Metronome, and The Ladder of Our Love are  based on my own body and brain. In these pieces I used sonograms, xrays, MRIs, etc, of my body, along with drawing, painting, digital manipulation, collage, and various mixtures of these mediums.

Time and Chance  and Seizure Disorder are among pieces in this show that use similar techniques regarding fixed ideas and/or disturbing aspects of time and technology.

What’s the most challenging thing about your creative process?

Probably the biggest obstacle is chronic physical pain.  I have several  spinal disorders and am limited physically. I’m not able to work on a large scale.I work everyday in spite of any but the most severe pain; the pain of not doing art is more intolerable..

What I call the frozen depression, which often holds hands with anxiety and  agitation, is also challenging to deal with.  I’ve learned to do art anyway during these times – force myself, if necessary,  and am learning to not be concerned  about the outcome of whatever I scribble down or slap around.  Just pour some art on it – no matter what “it” is.  “Nothing is so precious that it can’t be collaged on or painted over or thrown away,” a favorite art professor used to say. That phrase sticks with me and the philosophy has given me a lot of freedom.

Who are the other artists you look to for inspiration? And what about their work do you like?

 Bosch is a major influence, as are Frida Kahlo, Erich Fischel, William Blake, Joseph Cornell, Lucien Freud, Van Gogh, de Kooning, Tuculescu, Klimt, Thomas Chimes. The list goes on.

 

Please list your book, music and/or book recommendations.

Cruddy by Lynda Barry

The Stress of Her Regard by Tim Powers

The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You by Frank Stanford

What About This, Collected Poems of Frank Stanford

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky 

The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson

The Complete Illuminated Books by William Blake

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders

The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Mythology by Edith Hamilton 

 

Music Recommendations:

Bethlehem Steel

The Amps

Steve Earle 

Was, Not Was

John Hiatt, particularly his earlier work

James McMurtry

Coltrane

Miles Davis

B.B. King

Van Morrison

The Band

The Classical dudes

 

Leslie Norman Hubble’s work is inspired by content that disturbs her. She then constructs or manipulates those ideas into aesthetic images and objects.  She works to express a truth and raise questions about “mind and body, as well as concepts of time, culture, and technology.”

Hubble’s exhibition is part of the No Divide KC documentary series premiering at Johnson County Library September through December. 

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Introduce yourself and describe your work and the media/genre you work in.

My name is Leslie Norman Hubble, and I do art in a variety of media, including, acrylic painting, drawing, collage, assemblage, photography, photo manipulation, work with found objects, and combinations thereof.... Continue »

Storytime logo of a cat

Help Us Make Our Storytimes Even Better!

We'd love to hear your thoughts about our Storytimes! Please share your comments and suggestions here.

We'd love to hear your thoughts about our Storytimes! Please share your comments and suggestions here.

Turkey

Let's Talk Turkey

Ben Franklin suggested that turkeys should be our national bird. You can celebrate Thanksgiving with stories about wild turkeys. You’ll meet Jake O’Turkey, our animal friend. You can touch a real turkey egg and feel turkey feathers. We’ll go on a turkey food scavenger hunt and practice our turkey calls. A taxidermy specimen is included. Best for ages 3 and up, children under 7 with a caregiver.

Today at Antioch beginning at 3pm and 3:30pm. Register online or call (913) 826-4600. Presented by Ernie Miller Nature Center.

Ben Franklin suggested that turkeys should be our national bird. You can celebrate Thanksgiving with stories about wild turkeys. You’ll meet Jake O’Turkey, our animal friend. You can touch a real turkey egg and feel turkey feathers. We’ll go on a turkey food scavenger hunt and practice our turkey calls. A taxidermy specimen is included. Best for ages 3 and up, children under 7 with a caregiver.

Today at Antioch beginning at 3pm and 3:30pm. Register online or call (913) 826-4600. Presented by ... Continue »

WAVES

When the Navy Made WAVES

Last week the Johnson County Library celebrated Women in the Military. We discovered there is a lot of local history with military training and women right here in Johnson County. The United States’ decision to enter into World War II created an immediate demand for training facilities, factories, soldiers and other military personnel to aid in the war effort. The armed forces needed to expand their employment from a men-only operation, and quickly. Many branches of the military answered this call by creating special units specifically for women. The Olathe Naval Air Station located between Olathe and Gardner served as a primary training facility for one of these groups. Read more on JoCoHistory »

Last week the Johnson County Library celebrated Women in the Military. We discovered there is a lot of local history with military training and women right here in Johnson County. The United States’ decision to enter into World War II created an immediate demand for training facilities, factories, soldiers and other military personnel to aid in the war effort. The armed forces needed to expand their employment from a men-only operation, and quickly. Many branches of the military answered this call by creating special units specifically for women. The Olathe Naval Air Station located between Olathe and Gardner served as a primary training facility for one of these groups. Read more on... Continue »

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