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Joe Rubeo

Music Monday Local SpotlightJoe Rubeo

Rubeo is Joe Rubeo, a mostly self-taught musician and songwriter who describes his music as having a "unique nostalgic feel with heavy 80s synth bass and swirling melodies that make you want to get down on the dance floor." This only begins to describe the immersive and warm quality of music that according to Rubeo himself emanates in large part from a phone app called Auxy. Rubeo's music proves that in the right hands the tools right under our thumbs can help produce remarkable art. in this interview Rubeo describes his creative process, musical background and what's been inspiring him lately.

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Introduce yourself. Describe your music for new listeners.

I am Rubeo. The best way to describe my music as I have been told is that it is music that you want to dance and make love to. The Rubeo sound has a unique nostalgic feel with heavy 80s synth bass and swirling melodies that make you want to get down on the dance floor. 

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Food Insecurity, Romance Novels, and 6by6 ...

Did you hear about 6by6, Food Insecurity and Romance Novels?

We dedicate every Did you hear? episode to one of our many Library services. This time, it's 6 by 6: Ready to Read! It’s our early literacy program. Discover the 6 skills all kids should develop by age 6.

In this episode, Beth Atwater sits down with Melissa Horak-Hern and Gregg Winsor in our “We Recommend” section to discuss Romance novels! But first, It’s “What’s Happening.” Helen Hokanson, Amanda Wahlmeier and Dave Carson talk about food insecurity.  

Did you hear about 6by6, Food Insecurity and Romance Novels?

We dedicate every Did you hear? episode to one of our many Library services. This time, it's 6 by 6: Ready to Read! It’s our early literacy program. Discover the 6 skills all kids should develop by age 6.

In this episode, Beth Atwater sits down with Melissa Horak-Hern and Gregg Winsor in our “We Recommend” section to discuss Romance novels! But first, It’s “What’s Happening.” Helen Hokanson, Amanda Wahlmeier and Dave Carson talk about food insecurity.  

Group portrait

Throwback Thursday: Women's History Month

Three women stand in a work area near a table and a duplicating or addressing machine at Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant.

How many photos of women can be found at jocohistory.org? What are the stories behind these images? Get all the details. It's your place for Johnson County, Kansas history! Follow our hashtag on Twitter.

Three women stand in a work area near a table and a duplicating or addressing machine at Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant.

How many photos of women can be found at jocohistory.org? What are the stories behind these images? Get all the details. It's your place for Johnson County, Kansas history! Follow our hashtag on Twitter.

Una and Bob Walkenhorst

Father-Daughter Music Monday Local SpotlightUna and Bob Walkenhorst

The musical pairing of father-daughter folk duo Bob and Una Walkenhorst is a real treat for fans of harmony-rich, socially conscious folk music. A member of The Rainmakers since 1983, Bob Walkenhorst is an accomplished musician, songwriter and painter. Una is a recognized artist in her own right, releasing her debut album Scars in 2015. The duo released their acclaimed debut album For Tomorrow in late 2018. In this interview, Una and Bob describe how their musical collaboration came about and what's ahead for them in 2019.

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Una, when we first interviewed you back in 2015 you were in the middle of a self-guided tour of North America. You had just released your first album, Scars, and had set out on the road on your own as an act of musical and self discovery. Almost four years have passed since Scars. How do you feel about that album now? What did you learn from writing those songs and recording that album that helped bring shape to where you are now as an artist?

 

U: That first album was really a jumping off point for me. I had collected all these songs between the ages of 15 and 21 and I had absolutely no idea what to do with them. Between that and the fact that I had no training and had only played a couple of these songs live, I think Scars captures a real innocence and vulnerability in both the songwriting and the presentation. Having a fairly raw album like that showed me that even if I never became a pro at the technical stuff, I could still get a lot across with a well written song that’s honest and real. Going through that recording process with my dad also made it a little less intimidating to go back into the studio with him in 2018 since we had worked with a similar set up before.

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Career and Finance

Career and Finance

Ready for a new career? Let us help »

Resumes – It's All About You Tuesday, Feb 26, 6pm @ Blue Valley Library

The Self-Directed Job Search – Effective Strategies Thursday, Mar 7, 6pm @ Cedar Roe Library

 

So You Think You Can Interview Saturday, Apr 6, 10am @ Monticello Library

Networking for Professional Success Tuesday, Apr 23, 6pm @ Blue Valley Library

 

 

Ready for a new career? Let us help »

Resumes – It's All About You Tuesday, Feb 26, 6pm @ Blue Valley Library

The Self-Directed Job Search – Effective Strategies Thursday, Mar 7, 6pm @ Cedar Roe Library

 

So You Think You Can Interview Saturday, Apr 6, 10am @ Monticello Library

... Continue »

Park Street, Olathe 1890

Throwback Thursday. History repeats itself.

Ah yes! Back in the 1890s when snow was sepia toned. If you find yourself indoors today, do a search for "snow" and "winter" at jocohistory.org. It's your place for Johnson County, Kansas history! Follow our hashtag on Twitter.

Ah yes! Back in the 1890s when snow was sepia toned. If you find yourself indoors today, do a search for "snow" and "winter" at jocohistory.org. It's your place for Johnson County, Kansas history! Follow our hashtag on Twitter.

  • Marcia Streepy
    Marcia Streepy Marcia Streepy
  • Marcia Streepy
    Marcia Streepy Marcia Streepy
  • Marcia Streepy
    Marcia Streepy Marcia Streepy

Now @ Leawood: Marcia StreepyMarcia Streepy

Thursday, Jan 10, 2019 to Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at Leawood Pioneer Library

Influenced primarily by John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt, Kansas City-based painter Marcia Streepy enjoys the challenges of "plein air," or outdoor, painting. Her work depicts scenes of the natural world and city life painted on location. Whether she is applying oil paint, pastels, watercolors or pen and ink, the main hallmark of Streepy’s work is her use of vibrant color and light, which she says is motivated more by the “spirit of the object” than the realistic form of what she is trying to capture on the canvas. 

Please introduce yourself. How long have you been a painter?

I am a Modern American Impressionistic Painter, according to one client. I have been painting almost daily since 1965.  I painted and illustrated school papers, did posters for games, did a mural for extra money all before I went to college. Once in college, I took all the art classes I could while obtaining a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Painting is my passion. Nursing was my career.

I am married and have two daughters and two grandchildren. My mother was a fulltime artist who gave me inspiration. One significant factor in my life is that at age 12 I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and then lupus at age 30, so I have had times in my life when painting was very therapeutic.

Talk about the works currently on display at the Leawood Pioneer Library. What would you like people to know about them?

The two 60”x 60” paintings at Pioneer Library were done at the InterUrban Arthouse as memory paintings from the many plein-air paintings I have done in the Flint Hills of Kansas. The two smaller paintings are plein-air paintings done during the Brush Creek plein-air event and Kansas City Parks and Recreation event. The vertical painting of trees was done as an experiment in changing the horizon line to the top of the canvas. The backyard scene is so typical of the ordinary lonely back yards in winter. I hope the people who see my work at the library enjoy the color and vibrancy of the work and will able to relate to the beautiful Kansas sky.  Maybe they will recognize the pond at the discovery center and the utility mobile unit for the parks department.

If interested in seeing more of my work contact the artist or visit the InterUrban Arthouse.

Describe your creative process. How long does it typically take for you to complete a painting?

My creative process is first observing, looking at the world and selecting what interests me. Sometimes I see light on an object or the atmosphere of a scene that inspires me to try to courageously paint not knowing if the painting will be what I hope it will be.  Second, practice and more practice which helps me develop the skill to paint on paper or canvas.  Changing mediums helps me be more creative. I like to use watercolors, pastels, oils and acrylics. If someone asks me about starting a career as an artist, I tell them to buy a sketch book and continually draw. Inspiration comes from doing. 

How long does it take to finish a painting? I think all my paintings help develop the next painting, so to be truthful, each painting has taken me about 55 years and four weeks to complete.

What books, movies and/or music have inspired you recently? 

The books about other artists such as the impressionist or post-modern American, French or Swedish artists are inspiring. I enjoy studying individual artists work more than the step by step art books. I am in three book clubs and read every evening. I enjoy novels, historical or biographical and children’s literature.  The most recent art book that I purchased is “Fishing For Elephants” by Larry Moore.

The most recent movie I saw was “Mary Poppins Returns”. I thought the opening scenes were so artistic and I loved the scenes taken from the special bowl because the illustrated clothing was so fun on the actors. 

 

 

 

 

 

Influenced primarily by John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt, Kansas City-based painter Marcia Streepy enjoys the challenges of "plein air," or outdoor, painting. Her work depicts scenes of the natural world and city life painted on location. Whether she is applying oil paint, pastels, watercolors or pen and ink, the main hallmark of Streepy’s work is her use of vibrant color and light, which she says is motivated more by the “spirit of the object” than the realistic form of what she is trying to capture on the canvas. 

Please introduce yourself. How long have you been a painter?

I am a Modern American Impressionistic Painter, according to one client. I have been... Continue »

Dreamgirl

Dreamy Music Monday Local MusicDreamgirl

With a sound inspired by 80s synthpop, surf and dreampop, Dreamgirl's self-titled debut album is an affirmation of the potential shown on their previous two EPs. Led by singer Lacey Hopkins, the band's music is the product of a true collaboration between the members. We are lucky to bring you an interview with Hopkins about their debut album, songwriting process and what inspires them about music in Kansas City.

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Introduce the band and describe your music for new listeners.

Dreamgirl is Skylar Smith, Sam Stephan, Ian Dobyns, Austin Marks and Lacey Hopkins. We are from Kansas City, MO.

Our music is dreamy synth rock & roll; landlocked surf rock / dreampop / indie, female-fronted, with fun vocal harmonies. We've been compared to Tennis, TOPS, Shannon & the Clams and Cyndi Lauper. 
 

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Lenexa City Center

Lenexa City Center Library Opens Sunday, June 2!

The new Lenexa City Center Library will open its doors to the public on Sunday, June 2, 2019, 1:00 – 5:00 pm, the Johnson County Library Board of Directors announced at their February 14 board meeting. 

The June 2 event will be focused on the building and its amenities, according to Library Board chair Nancy Hupp. “This is a really striking and beautiful facility,” she says, “and we are eager to invite our patrons in so people can start using their new Library right away.”

A ribbon cutting will open the doors promptly at 1 pm. There will be remarks from public officials, and a recitation of a work commissioned for the occasion from the emerita Poet Laureate of Kansas, Wyatt Townley. Activities will include tours conducted by Library staff of the new building and an opportunity to meet Stephen T. Johnson, award-winning children’s book illustrator who is installing a new work of public art at the site. 

The afternoon event takes place during what will be regular Sunday service hours, confirming that Lenexa City Center joins 4 other branches which are open on Sundays.

The new 40,000 square foot building occupies two floors at the Lenexa City Center campus. In addition to high-quality library services, the new space features public meeting rooms, public computers and a robust children’s programming area. Construction cost is $21.1 million.

The new Lenexa City Center Library will open its doors to the public on Sunday, June 2, 2019, 1:00 – 5:00 pm, the Johnson County Library Board of Directors announced at their February 14 board meeting. 

The June 2 event will be focused on the building and its amenities, according to Library Board chair Nancy Hupp. “This is a really striking and beautiful facility,” she says, “and we are eager to invite our patrons in so people can start using their new Library right away.”

A ribbon cutting will open the doors promptly at 1 pm. There will be remarks from public officials, and a recitation of a... Continue »

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