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Wednesday, Jun 15, 2011


Wednesday, Jun 15, 2011


I am very excited to finally see WWII on the horizon in this series. I describe it as a "slow burn" to prospective readers because I need them to understand that Maisie isn't about action and adventure as much as she is about peeling away the layers of the people who lived through WWI.

Wednesday, Jun 15, 2011

Ann Angel's entirely accessible and compelling biography of Janis Joplin is a marvel of a book and well deserving of the 2011 YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction.

Wings of Fire by Charles Todd

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Rated by
Jane R.
Wednesday, Jun 1, 2011

This second in Todd’s Ian Rutledge mystery series, finds the Scotland Yard inspector investigating two apparent suicides and one accidental death of three siblings. The family and people of the Cornish village are satisfied with the coroner’s verdicts regarding the deaths and do not welcome Rutledge in their midst. However, a cousin of those who died wants to know more about what happened and why.

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

This true crime fiction genre book covers “the case of the century”. In the year 1909 a prominent Kansas City family because the center of investigation of a mysterious cases of mass poisoning. A wealthy Mr. Swope, who donated his land to the city for Swope park, and several members of his family, the Hydes, died under suspicions circumstances.

Buddha by Deepak Chopra

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Rated by
Sandra S.
Thursday, May 19, 2011

Buddha by Deepak Chopra

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

“If I only I opposable thumbs,” says Enzo, the narrator of this metaphor of life. Full of snippets of wisdom and insight, this is also the endearing story of a family in crisis. Enzo, a terrier-lab mix, is the soul-mate of Denny, an aspiring race car driver. Enzo and Denny became a pair when Denny is a bachelor, then a husband and father, a widower and accused felon.

The Confession by John Grisham

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Rated by
Jane R.
Wednesday, May 11, 2011

This is not a “sit back in your recliner and relax” kind of book. Grisham’s opposition to the death penalty is evident in his previous work, but in this one he brings the gavel down and spares the reader no detail. There is suspense and very edgy moments in this no-holds-barred opinion piece.

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